STUPIDITY IN 19TH CENTURY MEDICINE

Authors

  • James F. Welles Ph.D

Abstract

 

            In the mid-19th century, medical sciences offered the world a pair of unfortunate examples of stupidity in the development of the germ theory, which can be traced back to Girolamo Fran-castoro, who suggested in his De Contagion (1546) that illnesses were spread by “Seeds of dis-ease”.[i] Unfortunately, in the early 19th century, the attitude of Western civilization to cleanliness was such that the use of the bathtub in Philadelphia in 1832 was prohibited by a local ordinance on sanitary grounds, and their use in Boston was prohibited in 1845 except on the advice of a phy-sician.[ii] At that time, cleanliness and the germ theory of disease were very much at odds with popular theories that illness was an expression of God's wrath against a sinner and/or caused by the breathing of bad air. 

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Published

2019-03-08

How to Cite

Welles, J. F. (2019). STUPIDITY IN 19TH CENTURY MEDICINE. Journal of Medical Reviews, 2(2). Retrieved from http://medicalreviews.info/index.php/jmr/article/view/27